What's the First Thing You Should Learn in a New Language? - OUINO™

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4 reasons to learn a new language | John McWhorter

English is fast becoming the world's universal language, and instant translation technology is improving every year. So why bother learning a foreign language? Linguist and Columbia professor John McWhorter shares four alluring benefits of learning an unfamiliar tongue. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

The surprising habits of original thinkers | Adam Grant

How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies "originals": thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals — including embracing failure. "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they're the ones who try the most," Grant says. "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones." TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

What's the Hardest Part of Learning a New Language? - OUINO™

People often wonder what struggles are waiting for them when starting to learn a new language. Everyone has heard that learning a language is hard. This can be intimidating when you don't know what to expect. But is it really as hard as people say? The most difficult part of learning a new language is certainly different for everyone, but there are 6 things that seem to be reoccurring challenges for most. In this post, we'll talk about these challenges and give you some quick tips on how to make it easier. The Very Beginning. For most people learning their first foreign language, the very beginning is the hardest part. They just don't know where to start. Do they start with grammar rules? Learning lots of vocabulary? Do they learn key phrases first? All these questions can easily make them feel overwhelmed, and the journey ends before it even begins. It doesn't need to be this way. Remember that any step you take in language learning is a step forward; there is no specific direction you need to take. However, having some kind of plan when just starting out can make the whole experience more enjoyable. There are lots of resources out there, just pick one that fits your learning style and budget. It could be language exchange, private teachers, local workshops or a quality language course like Ouino. Once you build a solid foundation, learning on your own becomes much easier. Learning Thousands of New Words. A language has lots of words. You certainly won't have to learn all of them, but you will eventually need to learn thousands of them. For the vast majority of people, this is a huge challenge and it can sound nearly impossible. The truth is that learning lots of new words is not all that difficult, it just takes time. You have to remind yourself that baby steps do add up very quickly. Let me ask you this: Do you think you can remember 6 words today? What about tomorrow? And the day after? If you learn only 6 words a day, you'll learn over 2000 words in the next year. That's the vocabulary equivalent of a five year old. When you break down your goal into smaller parts, it doesn't look nearly as daunting. Remembering the Words You Learned. A very common issue people experience when learning a language is that they forget the words they already learned. It becomes a never-ending learning loop. How do you avoid forgetting everything you learn? Two words: Repetition and variation. Memory has a way of fading if things are not reinforced. It's all about exposing yourself to the language in as many ways as possible. If you learn words and never hear them and use them again, it'll be next to impossible to remember. But if you learn the words, and then watch movies, read books, listen to music and immerse yourself in the language, you'll see that remembering the words won't be nearly as hard as you think it is. It'll be fairly natural in fact. Understanding Native Speakers. We have all heard people say that native speakers speak way too fast. That's true for all languages. Native speakers are masters at their own language and they can understand each other even when they mumble their way through the sentence. Again, the cure is to listen to the language as much as possible. Watch movies, listen to audiobooks, podcasts etc. Keep in mind that it's best to gradually move up and look from material that's not too advanced for you at first. Start with material designed for children and slowly make your way up the chain of difficulty. The fact is that if you don't understand anything at all, you probably won't learn much. The language becomes a bullet proof wall. But if you understand a few words here and there, you will grind it out and make progress. Simply put, listen to a lot of content and your listening will naturally improve. (more on our website...)

11 Secrets to Memorize Things Quicker Than Others

We learn things throughout our entire lives, but we still don’t know everything because we forget a lot of information. Bright Side will tell you about 11 simple memorizing tips that will help you remember everything and improve your memory. TIMESTAMPS Why we forget things 1:04 How to remember everything 2:00 How to memorize something quickly 2:30 How to memorize something for a long time 3:20 Try to understand what you learn 4:17 Learn the most necessary information 5:11 Serial position effect 5:45 Interference theory 6:06 Learn opposite things 7:22 Build your own «mind palace» 7:22 Use «nail words» 8:19 Make up stories 8:40 Use a tape recorder 9:10 Visualize 9:51 Choose only the best materials 9:59 SUMMARY - Your brain is like a hard drive — the space is limited. Remember Sherlock Holmes? He couldn’t name all the planets of the Solar system — this was not because he missed school or something like that, but because he was too smart to have such irrelevant information in his memory. He deliberately erased facts he would never need. This is what your brain does: it protects you from overloading with information. That’s why all new data is stored in the short-term memory, not the long-term one. So, if you don’t repeat it or use it, you forget it very quickly. A German psychologist, Hermann Ebbinghaus researched the memory and its mechanisms. He described the Forgetting Curve which shows that just one hour after learning something new we forget more than half of the learned information. One day later we remember only about 30% percent. Well, you see where this is going. - There is a memorization technique called «Spaced repetition». To keep some information in your head for a longer time, you need to try to put it into your long-term memory. Forced memorization is not very effective in this case because your brain can’t make sense of the information quickly and form strong associations. Here it all depends on the reason why you are learning something. - To memorize something quickly, repeat the information right after learning it. The second repetition should be after 15-20 minutes. You don’t need to return to the information between repetitions — just rest and do something different. Let your brain relax. Repeat the learned material the third time after 6-8 hours. And you should have the final repetition 24 hours after the first contact with the information. Do you know any other memorizing tips? If yes, share them in the comment section below! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/

A lot of people are confused as to where to start when learning a new language. After all, there are so many things to learn. They want to make sure to start on the right track. There are obviously things that are more important to learn than others, so it's nice to have a learning plan. But this can also be a double-edged sword; some people are so confused as to where to start, that they never really do. All that time spent trying to find the perfect way to do things, could have been spent actually learning the language. Remember that anything you learn is a step in the right direction, so get started as soon as possible! However, we also believe that some aspects of language learning should be put as a priority. In this post, we will talk about a few things that, if learned early, can give you a major learning boost and make things easier for you in the long run.

Number 1: The Alphabet.

Luckily, in many languages, the alphabet will be the same or be very similar to the one you already know. If the alphabet is similar, try to see if there are special characters or accented letters that you don't know. If the alphabet is completely different, spend some time familiarizing yourself with the new letters. Knowing the alphabet is a huge step in the right direction and it can be done rather quickly in many languages.

Number 2: Pronunciation.

The next step should be to learn the proper pronunciation of the most common sounds in the language. Although the alphabet may be very similar, it doesn't mean that the pronunciation is the same. Learning the rules of pronunciation early on, will help you read correctly throughout the learning process and ensure that you're understood in the long run. It also means that you won't take in bad pronunciation habits. This doesn't mean that you need to master pronunciation from the get go. You just need to be aware of the sounds, so that you can practice the correct pronunciation as you learn the language. If you're simply unaware that you're pronouncing things incorrectly, you will never improve. Some sounds are very difficult to pronounce; it's totally fine to have some trouble at first. But if you know how they should sound, you will get there with practice.

Number 3: Basic Sentences.

It's also a good idea to learn some easy pre-made sentences, in order to start using the language as soon as possible. Learn sentences that will be very useful to you in everyday life, or while traveling. You can start having very short conversations with pre-made sentences in just a few hours. These sentences will help you practice your pronunciation, and give you a feel for the structure of the language. (more on our blog)

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