A Japanese Method to Develop Creativity in Kids

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Japanese people are known for their intelligence, politeness, and wellness. Why is this nation so unique and different from the rest of the world? It seems we’ve found the answer – they have an incredibly cool education system and unique teaching methods! Watch till the end – there is a small but brilliant bonus for you.

Let’s start with a unique Japanese method in the schools for developing creativity in kids. We believe that the whole world needs to adopt! It’s called “Nameless paints.” Japanese designers named Yusuke Imai and Ayami Moteki created an unusual set to teach kids colors and painting. This fantastic set won the 2012 Kokuyo Design Award.

Let’s see how it works. “Nameless paints” includes ten tubes that don’t have color names such as “yellow,” “blue,” or “green.” Instead, there are only spots of a particular color or colors on each tube. As you can see, the spots are also different sizes.
The designers’ aim is to change the way kids think and learn. They want children to understand what shade they will get if they mix certain colors.
For instance, a child looks at the tube with two spots: pink and blue. He doesn’t know what color hides inside. He squeezes the tube and gets… purple color! So, as a result, the kid learns that the same amounts of pink and blue paints create purple.
Here’s another example – a tube with a big blue spot and small pink one. It means if you mix a small amount of the pink color and a large amount of the blue color, you’ll get dark-blue color. Interesting, right?
As you can see, each tube hides a particular color inside. Pink, yellow, blue, purple, red, dark green, dark blue, orange, light-green, and black. However, to get one of these shades, the child should think about which colors create it.
As a result, they learn how to create new colors and how to mix them. It’s an easy and fun way to understand the color theory.
Recent studies have shown that free thinking is an attribute that a person can acquire over time, and the schools play the most important part in developing creativity.

Now, here’s the bonus – 10 brilliant features of the Japanese education system the whole world needs to adopt. The success of the Japanese culture is very simple: they put a lot of effort and time in the education system trying to make it not only useful but also fun.

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