AE Live Teacher Development Event 2.6 - Hands-on Language Learning with Mobile Devices

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5 techniques to speak any language | Sid Efromovich | TEDxUpperEastSide

Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: http://bit.ly/1FAg8hB Sid is our resident hyperpolyglot. He grew up in Brazil and after some journeying around the world, he now lives an exciting life in New York where he works as a Sugar Trader. Teaching has always been one of his passions and he has led groups of young leaders since 2006. He has given workshops, talks and classes in 3 different continents and is currently a Master Teacher in Skillshare where he teaches classes on nurturing happiness and learning foreign languages. Sid is also the founder of I Embrace You (formerly called Hug Don't Hate), based in Boston. After presiding over the organization and leading over 100 volunteers annually, he was recognized with the top leadership award in his graduating class at Boston University. He also holds an MBA from Purdue University and from Leibniz Universität. http://guywiththesmile.com In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Improve your Vocabulary: Stop saying VERY!

Using the same word again and again is boring, which is why native English speakers use a wide variety of vocabulary to express their thoughts and feelings. In this vocabulary lesson, I will teach you how to express yourself more effectively by replacing the word "very" with more precise and interesting adjectives. For example, you can replace "very cold" with "freezing". This illustrates your point more precisely. You will sound more natural and intelligent. Using these adjectives on the speaking section of IELTS and TOEFL exams will impress your examiner and improve your score. Watch the video to discover many more examples of this kind of vocabulary substitution. Variety is the spice of life! Next, watch my lesson on how to learn vocabulary FAST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_aA-Hc74Ag TRANSCRIPT "Getting from here to there, it's been a long while." Oh, hi. My time is finally here. James from engVid. I can't believe this, this is like the Mirror Universe. If you watch Star Trek, you'll understand; if not, go watch Mirror Universe with Star Trek. I have two, look at them, I have two Mr. Es. In the first one Mr. E is hot, and the first one Mr. E is cold. Let's go to the board. E, what's up? "It's very hot. 35 degrees centigrade." You're right. I see you're wearing your Bermuda shorts. And the second E is saying he's very cold: "It's minus 30 degrees centigrade." Ow, this isn't good. I feel for you. But don't you think there are better ways to say it's very hot or it's very cold? I think so, and in today's lesson I'm going to teach some of you... Not some of you. I'm going to teach all of you how to get rid of the word "very" to describe everything, and use other words which give more information, which will make you sound more like a native speaker and make your writing phenomenal. Oh, "phenomenal"? That's a word for "very good". Are you ready? Let's go to the board. So, today's lesson is on "very". "Very" is a very good word, that's why we use it, but when you're writing, to hear somebody say: "Very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very" is what we call monotonous, it means "mono" as one, "tonous", one tone, one sound - very boring. So let's change that from you being... You know, using "very" because I teach and I notice a lot of students saying things, like: "Teacher, today it's very cold outside." I'm like: -"Yeah, it is." -"And I'm very tired and very hungry." I'm like: "Okay, okay." It's like being punched in the face again and again, and I just want to say: "Stop with the 'very'. Use a different word." But it's not fair because "very" is a very good word-there, I did it again-we just need to find other words to make your language sound richer to improve it so you sound more like a native English speaker, and to make it more interesting for you because it will express more of who you are and your ideas in a better way. It makes you unique. You ready? Let's go to the board. You'll notice I put "very" in red because this is something we don't want to do, we don't want to keep saying: "very". We want to change that up. And I'm going to give you a list of words that people or students usually say when they say "very" that I've heard many, many times. And maybe you've done this. And today I'm going to give you singular words to use instead. I'll explain them, just in case they're difficult. Let's start with the first one. People say: "Very rude", instead of saying that, you can say: "vulgar". "Vulgar" means very rude, and if somebody says to me: "Your language is vulgar", I'll probably stop talking because it means it's not right, it's inappropriate, it's very bad. Vulgar. "I don't like your vulgar tone", your rude tone. It's strong. "Very short", another word we say is "brief", which means small. We had a very brief... We had a very brief conversation, a very short conversation. Cool? "Boring". When you say: "Class was very boring today", you can say: "dull". "Dull" means very boring. It also means... See? Here's a bonus when you use these words, stupid. If you say someone is dull, you can say they're very boring, or dull meaning they're stupid. Don't use it like that too often; people don't like being called stupid. And if you say: "He's rather dull, isn't he?" I have to listen for context to mean stupid or boring. Next one, everybody's favourite: "Very good". "Teacher, the food is very good. The lesson is very good. I like this, it's very good." Why don't we change that to the word "superb"? Look carefully at the word "superb", you have the word "super" written inside it. "Super" means what? Above average, excellent, or superb, very good. "The food was superb." People don't usually use this word, so if you tell me when I cook for you that it's superb, I'm telling you right now I will take that as such an amazing compliment. Gentlemen, if you tell a woman she looks superb, she'll be like: "Thank you. Really?" Because no one says it. All right? […]

What makes a good teacher great? | Azul Terronez | TEDxSantoDomingo

I've been asking the question: What makes a good teacher great? for 24 years. I have collected 26,000 responses from 8 different schools and patterns have emerged. For the last 24 years, he has repeatedly asked students the same question, "What makes a good teacher great?" Azul Terronez is the author of the best-selling book "The art of Apprenticeship" Azul has coached teachers and schools leaders around the world in Spain, Chile, Canada, India, United States and China and he is currently serves as a teacher coach at Shanghai American School. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Language Teaching Methods: Community Language Learning

Language Teaching Methods explores various methodologies of English language teaching. This was a joint project by Diane Larsen-Freeman and the U.S. Information Agency and was produced in 1990. This video demonstrates Community Language Learning with Bonnie Mennell.

Learn British accents and dialects – Cockney, RP, Northern, and more!

Did you know that there are over 30 different English accents in England alone? And that's not all. Would you believe there are over a hundred different English dialects accross the world? In this lesson, I will tell you about some common British accents you might hear. You'll hear examples of Cockney, RP, Estuary, Northern, Scottish, Welsh, and many more accents. Don't miss this opportunity to add some spice to your English pronunciation and comprehension! Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/learn-british-accents-and-dialects-cockney-rp-northern-and-more/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is about accents in the U.K. So, U.K. accents and also dialects. Okay, so what's the difference between an accent and a dialect? Right. Well, an accent, as you know, is to do with pronunciation, how you pronounce the word. Dialect is when you have a word that only people in a certain area of the country use; it's not a national word, it's a local word that maybe people from other parts of the country, they won't even know what it means, so that's dialect. Okay. So, let's just have a look through some of the accents that we have in the U.K. The one that you're probably learning as you're learning to pronounce English words is RP. "RP" stands for "Received Pronunciation". It's a slightly strange term. "Received" where do you receive it from? Well, maybe you receive it from your teacher. This is how to say this word. It's a slightly strange expression, but RP, it's usually referred to by the initials. And it's the kind of accent you will hear if you're watching BBC Television programs or listening to BBC Radio. Not everybody on the BBC speaks with an RP accent. The news readers tend to be RP speakers, but not always. But the strange thing is that in this country, only a very small percentage of people do speak with this accent. Apparently, just 3%, but they tend to be people in positions of power, authority, responsibility. They probably earn a lot of money. They live in big houses. You know the idea. So, people like the Prime Minster, at the moment David Cameron, he went to a private school, he went to university, Oxford, so people who have been to Oxford and Cambridge Universities often speak in RP, even if they didn't speak in RP before they went to Oxford or Cambridge, they often change their accent while they are there because of the big influence of their surroundings and the people that they're meeting. So that's RP. It's a very clear accent. So, it's probably a good idea to either learn to speak English with an RP accent, or you may be learning with an American accent, a Canadian accent, all of those accents are very clear. Okay. And being clear is the most important thing. Okay, so moving on. RP, as I should have said, is mostly in the south of the country; London and the south. So, also "Cockney" and "Estuary English" are in the south. Okay. So, Cockney is the local London accent, and it tends to spread further out to places like Kent, Essex, other places like that. Surrey. There's a newer version of Cockney called "Estuary English". If you think an estuary is connected to a river, so the River Thames which flows across the country, goes quite a long way west. So anyone living along the estuary, near the river can possibly have this accent as well. So, just to give you some examples, then, of the Cockney accent, there are different features. So, one example is the "th" sound, as you know to make a "th" sound, some of you may find it difficult anyway, "the", when you put your tongue through your teeth, "the", but a Cockney person may not use the "the", they will use an "f" sound or a "v" sound instead, so the word "think", "I think", they would say would say instead of: "think", they would say it like that: "fink", "fink", and the top teeth are on the bottom lip, "think". And words like "with" that end with the "th", instead of "with", it will be "wiv", "wiv", "wiv". "Are you coming wiv me?" So that is one of the things that happens with the Cockney accent. Words like "together" would be "togever". Okay? The number "three", t-h-r-e-e is often pronounced "free": "We have free people coming to dinner. Free people." So, there can be confusion there, because we have the word "free", which has a meaning in itself, "free", but if you actually mean "three", the number three, there can be some confusion. So don't get confused by "free people". -"Oh, they're free? They're free to come?" -"No, there are three of them. Three people who are free to come." Ah, okay.

With a mobile device students can learn English while engaging in activities that get them out of their seats talking and exploring. This webinar introduces mobile language learning activities that require no Internet connection. Instead, language learners are encouraged to take pictures, record audio, make a movie, and partner with peers to enhance all four skills- reading, writing, speaking, and listening. This webinar will also offer tips for keeping students focused.

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