Language Models in Deep Learning using CNN -- Part I

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This is what happens when you reply to spam email | James Veitch

Suspicious emails: unclaimed insurance bonds, diamond-encrusted safe deposit boxes, close friends marooned in a foreign country. They pop up in our inboxes, and standard procedure is to delete on sight. But what happens when you reply? Follow along as writer and comedian James Veitch narrates a hilarious, months-long exchange with a spammer who offered to cut him in on a hot deal. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

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Communication is critical to success in business and life. Concerned about an upcoming interview? Anxious about being asked to give your thoughts during a meeting? Fearful about needing to provide critical feedback in the moment? You are not alone! Learn and practice techniques that will help you speak spontaneously with greater confidence and clarity, regardless of content and context. Recorded on October 25, 2014, in collaboration with the Stanford Alumni Association as part of Stanford Reunion Homecoming and the Graduate School of Business Fall Reunion/Alumni Weekend. Speaker: Matt Abrahams, ’91 Matt Abrahams is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, teaching strategic communication; he also teaches public speaking in Stanford’s Continuing Studies Program.

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When a very young child looks at a picture, she can identify simple elements: "cat," "book," "chair." Now, computers are getting smart enough to do that too. What's next? In a thrilling talk, computer vision expert Fei-Fei Li describes the state of the art — including the database of 15 million photos her team built to "teach" a computer to understand pictures — and the key insights yet to come. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

How to Learn Anything... Fast - Josh Kaufman

Author and business adviser Josh Kaufman reveals a new approach for acquiring new skills quickly with just a small amount of practice each day. To find out more about this talk, visit the event page on the RSA website: http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2013/how-to-learn-anything-fast Listen to the podcast of the full event including audience Q&A: http://www.thersa.org/__data/assets/file/0004/1524154/20130604JoshKaufman.mp3 Follow the RSA on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thersaorg Like the RSA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thersaorg Our events are made possible with the support of our Fellowship. Support us by donating or applying to become a Fellow. Donate: http://www.thersa.org/support-the-rsa Become a Fellow: http://www.thersa.org/fellowship/apply

11 Secrets to Memorize Things Quicker Than Others

We learn things throughout our entire lives, but we still don’t know everything because we forget a lot of information. Bright Side will tell you about 11 simple memorizing tips that will help you remember everything and improve your memory. TIMESTAMPS Why we forget things 1:04 How to remember everything 2:00 How to memorize something quickly 2:30 How to memorize something for a long time 3:20 Try to understand what you learn 4:17 Learn the most necessary information 5:11 Serial position effect 5:45 Interference theory 6:06 Learn opposite things 7:22 Build your own «mind palace» 7:22 Use «nail words» 8:19 Make up stories 8:40 Use a tape recorder 9:10 Visualize 9:51 Choose only the best materials 9:59 SUMMARY - Your brain is like a hard drive — the space is limited. Remember Sherlock Holmes? He couldn’t name all the planets of the Solar system — this was not because he missed school or something like that, but because he was too smart to have such irrelevant information in his memory. He deliberately erased facts he would never need. This is what your brain does: it protects you from overloading with information. That’s why all new data is stored in the short-term memory, not the long-term one. So, if you don’t repeat it or use it, you forget it very quickly. A German psychologist, Hermann Ebbinghaus researched the memory and its mechanisms. He described the Forgetting Curve which shows that just one hour after learning something new we forget more than half of the learned information. One day later we remember only about 30% percent. Well, you see where this is going. - There is a memorization technique called «Spaced repetition». To keep some information in your head for a longer time, you need to try to put it into your long-term memory. Forced memorization is not very effective in this case because your brain can’t make sense of the information quickly and form strong associations. Here it all depends on the reason why you are learning something. - To memorize something quickly, repeat the information right after learning it. The second repetition should be after 15-20 minutes. You don’t need to return to the information between repetitions — just rest and do something different. Let your brain relax. Repeat the learned material the third time after 6-8 hours. And you should have the final repetition 24 hours after the first contact with the information. Do you know any other memorizing tips? If yes, share them in the comment section below! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/

Deep Learning based Natural Language Processing employs multiple encoding decoding layers of neural networks to learn the hierarchical representation of data. Convolutional Neural Networks are widely deployed for this purpose. In this video, a renowned German professor Marcus Liwicki demonstrates how and when the Deep Convolutional Neural Networks can be used for developing the language models.

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