Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

Author channel Big Think   6 год. назад
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Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century - with Steven Pinker

Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the recycled dogma of style guides with reason and evidence. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Watch the Q&A here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rYAnYXIhL0 In this brand-new talk, introduced by Lord Melvyn Bragg, Steven argues that style still matters: in communicating effectively, in enhancing the spread of ideas, in earning a reader’s trust and, not least, in adding beauty to the world. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster, writer and novelist. He was made a Life Peer (Lord Bragg of Wigton) in 1998. Since then he has hosted over 660 episodes of In Our Time on subjects ranging from Quantum Gravity to Truth. He was presenter of the BBC radio series The Routes of English, a history of the English language. He is currently Chancellor of the University of Leeds Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter

Lessons from the longest study on human development | Helen Pearson

For the past 70 years, scientists in Britain have been studying thousands of children through their lives to find out why some end up happy and healthy while others struggle. It's the longest-running study of human development in the world, and it's produced some of the best-studied people on the planet while changing the way we live, learn and parent. Reviewing this remarkable research, science journalist Helen Pearson shares some important findings and simple truths about life and good parenting. Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Discovering One's Hidden Psychopathy

Neuroscientist James Fallon discusses how he came to discover, and how he's learned to live with, the fact that he's a borderline psychopath. Fallon is the author of The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain (http://goo.gl/ioGrhS). Don't miss new Big Think videos!  Subscribe by clicking here: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Transcript: My book, The Psychopath Inside, is a memoir and it's a mix of a personal story and what the science is, that is, the psychiatry and the genetics and the neuroscience behind what the subject is which is psychopathy. But it's really a story about somebody, me, who at 60 finds out he's not really who he thought he was all along in his whole life. And not until I had just by serendipity, by chance, started to run across biological evidence first from PET scans, positron emission tomography scans, that I was involved with -- acted as a control in one study in Alzheimer's disease and also had my genetics done. So it was just as a control and to compare to other people with Alzheimer's. And so it was through that about, oh, seven years ago that I found out something very strange. And this something strange both in terms of my brain pattern and genetics happened to run, it intersected with another study I had been doing -- a minor study on looking at PET scans and FMRIs, another kind of brain scan, and SPEC scans of killers, really bad murderers. And these are particularly bad hombres and some serial killers, et cetera. And I had looked at these and had been asked to analyze them over the years from the early 1990s onward. And about the same time, 2005, when I was doing my own scans for this Alzheimer's study I had a whole group of these killers and also psychopaths and looked at a pattern. I said, "My God, there's a pattern in the brain for these guys." And so I started to talk about it, give talks and, you know, at academic institutions and psychiatry departments, law schools, et cetera, just to kind of vet the idea. But at the same time I got this pile of scans back that included my own and these other controls. And I was looking through -- I got to the last scan of that study of the Alzheimer's and I looked at it and I asked my technician. I said, "You've got to check the machine because this is obviously one of the killers." One of the murderers. It looked like really a severe case of brain activity loss in a psychopath. And so when I ultimately they said, "No, this is part of -- it's in this control group." And I had to tear back the name on it because I always do everything blind but this was like something's really wrong. And it turned out to be my name. So it was like, you know, Gandalf shows up at the door and you're it. So that started this whole trajectory. Now at first I laughed at it and I just didn't care. We were so busy working on the genetics of Alzheimer's and also schizophrenia and I had just started an adult STEM cell company. And so I was so busy with stuff I kind of let it go for a couple of years really -- about a year and a half. But then the genetics came back and I had all the genetic alleles, the forms of the genes that are associated with a high aggression and violence, psychopathy, and a low kind of empathy, that intrapersonal emotional empathy. And low anxiety. And when I got that back I started to take a little bit of note but I still didn't care about it. And it wasn't until I ended up giving a talk. I was asked to give a talk with the ex-prime minister of Oslo who had bipolar disorder. And so I went to Oslo to give a public talk with him, the clinician, on bipolar. You know, what's the brain patterns. And I had to use my own example of how you do imaging genetics. Take imaging of the brain, genetics, put it together in a mathematical model and how we figure it out so it can be used for all sorts of psychiatry medicine. And in the audience were all these psychiatrists there and I went through my own pathologies if you will and near clinical syndromes and my genetics and my brain scan. And at the end the head of the department there said, "You don't even know this I bet but you're bipolar first of all because you don't have the kind of bipolar in the United States that they use, one of the kinds." So this is interesting. [TRANSCRIPT TRUNCATED] Directed/Produced by Jonathan Fowler, Elizabeth Rodd, and Dillon Fitton

1. Introduction to Human Behavioral Biology

(March 29, 2010) Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky gave the opening lecture of the course entitled Human Behavioral Biology and explains the basic premise of the course and how he aims to avoid categorical thinking. Stanford University http://www.stanford.edu Stanford Department of Biology http://biology.stanford.edu/ Stanford University Channel on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/stanford

12 Things You Should Not Do In The Morning

There are certain things you should not do in the morning! These morning habits can ruin your mood, zap your energy, and set the stage for an unproductive rest of the day. We checked out what scientists and wellness experts had to say about making the most and the least of the first 60 minutes after you wake up. In this video, we've rounded up 12 common wake-up mistakes that you'll want to avoid! Getting up in the morning can be a real hassle. We often start our days on autopilot and go through our morning routines. All the while forgetting about our well-being. If you ever feel like you don’t get enough done throughout the day, perhaps you’re doing some things you should not be doing in the morning. Sometimes, these bad habits are inevitable, and some of these suggestions may seem really challenging. But, if you can keep your mornings more calm and restful, experts say you'll feel better throughout the day. Of course, not every morning is going to be perfect. But if you make some effort to avoid these morning mistakes, you might find that the remainder of the day turns out a lot better than you expected. So, if you want to improve yourself, keep in mind the things not to do in the morning and make some changes accordingly. How do you start your day? Are you guilty of any of the things mentioned on this list? Let us know in the comments below. If you enjoyed this video, you may also like: How To Overcome Laziness - 10 Tips To Stop Being Lazy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi6Sdwsqfc0 How To Quit Bad Habits For Good https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqWLTlu0IfI How To Simplify Your Life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKDiudo23L0 ------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe To Our Channel for More Videos Like This! TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/brainydose FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/brainydose INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/brainydose WEBSITE: http://www.brainydose.com ------------------------------------------------------------------

Steven Pinker - Psychologist, Cognitive Scientist, and Linguist at Harvard University

How did humans acquire language? In this lecture, best-selling author Steven Pinker introduces you to linguistics, the evolution of spoken language, and the debate over the existence of an innate universal grammar. He also explores why language is such a fundamental part of social relationships, human biology, and human evolution. Finally, Pinker touches on the wide variety of applications for linguistics, from improving how we teach reading and writing to how we interpret law, politics, and literature.

The Floating University
Originally released September, 2011.

Additional Lectures:
Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NbBjNiw4tk

Joel Cohen: Joel Cohen: An Introduction to Demography (Malthus Miffed: Are People the Problem?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vr44C_G0-o

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