Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques

Author channel Stanford Graduate School of Business   4 год. назад
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How to Start a Speech

Subscribe for my new educational videos: http://bit.ly/utube-rhetorical Check out my TED talk (coming up to 750k views): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXCiv4sc5eY "The Discipline of Finishing: Conor Neill at TEDxUniversidaddeNavarra" -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- I am Conor Neill. I teach. I share tips. I ask questions. I'm a member of EO, President of Vistage in Spain and teach at IESE Business School. Shout out if you've been there or done that ;-) on https://www.facebook.com/rhetorical on https://twitter.com/conorneill on https://es.linkedin.com/in/conor I'd love you to subscribe. My best ideas for videos come from your questions. What is your struggle? Subscribe for my new educational videos: http://bit.ly/utube-rhetorical Watch this video and more in the "Develop Your Speaking Skills" Playlist: http://bit.ly/speakcourse I have been teaching Persuasive Communications on MBA courses at IESE Business School for 10 years. This is part of a collection of short lessons compiled from my courses and shared for use both as a support to my classes, and a way of sharing this valuable knowledge to a wider audience via these awesome digital tools ;-) Visit my channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/rhetoricaljourney?feature=mhee Subscribe to receive new videos in your feed: http://bit.ly/utube-rhetorical http://www.conorneill.com What are the first words of a speech? What should be the first sentence of a speech? How can you engage an audience from the first moment? There are 3 ways to start a speech.

How to manage your time well?

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HOW TO LOVE YOUR WORK | Simon Sinek

HOW TO LOVE YOUR WORK | Simon Sinek Simon Sinek speaks on how to be fulfilled by your job and how companies can better support and inspire the people who work for them. Speaker - Simon Sinek https://www.youtube.com/user/SimonSinek Source: CreativeMornings HQ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-ZA3QN2nDmqOSujn8zvNjw ===================================================== FAIR-USE COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER * Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, commenting, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. 1)This video has no negative impact on the original works (It would actually be positive for them) 2)This video is also for teaching purposes. 3)It is not transformative in nature. 4)I only used bits and pieces of videos to get the point across where necessary. We does not own the rights to these video clips. They have, in accordance with fair use, been repurposed with the intent of educating and inspiring others.

Think Fast. Talk Smart | Matt Abrahams | TEDxMontaVistaHighSchool

Stanford lecturer and entrepreneur Matt Abrahams is an expert on interpersonal communication and presentation. His talk at TEDxMontaVistaHighSchool's 2015 Spring conference explains the ins and outs of impromptu and public speaking. Matt Abrahams is a passionate, collaborative and innovative educator and coach. Matt teaches both Strategic Communication and Effective Communication at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. Matt is also Co-Founder and Principal at Bold Echo Communications Solutions, a presentation and communication skills company based in Silicon Valley that helps people improve their presentation skills. Matt has worked with executives to help prepare and present keynote addresses and IPO road shows, conduct media interviews, and deliver TED talks. Finally, Matt recently published the second edition of his book Speaking Up Without Freaking Out, a book written to help people become more confident, authentic, and compelling presenters. Prior to teaching, Matt held senior leadership positions in several leading software companies, where he created and ran global training and development organizations. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Six Ways to Get People to Say “Yes”

Robert Cialdini, author of Pre-Suasion, describes to Inc. president Eric Schurenberg the most important factors for influencing people. 6 Powerful Compliance Triggers Reciprocation — There is an overwhelming urge to repay debts, to do something in return when something is done for us. This deep-seated urge is so strong, noted palaeontologist Richard Leaky has said that it is the very essence of what it means to be human. Sociologist Alvin Gouldner points out that no society on Earth escapes the reciprocity principle. Commitment and Consistency — We are driven to remain consistent in our attitudes, words, and actions. So, when we are led to make a commitment of some kind, to go on record or take a stand or make a decision, there is an urge to remain consistent with that original commitment later on. The key is to get the initial commitment, which can appear small, reasonable, and innocent. This commitment can not only lead to compliance via the principle of consistency, but also to further compliance for larger requests. Social Proof — Most of us are imitators in most of what we do. We look to others for guidance, especially when we are uncertain about something. We ask, “What do others think about this? What do others feel? What do others do?” Then we act accordingly, all thanks to the power of social proof. Liking — No matter how reasonable we may think ourselves to be, we are always more likely to say “yes” to those we know and like. We readily comply with requests from those who are similar to us and for whom we have good feelings. It’s what makes refusing to buy Tupperware from a friend or relative next to impossible. Authority — In this age of specialization, we are more prone to respond to authority than ever before. Regardless of an independent spirit, we look to experts or those we perceive to be experts to give us the answers and show us the way. Even the mere symbols of authority, such as titles and specialized clothing, are enough to trigger a response. Example: Note how seeing someone with a white smock and stethoscope instantly suggests “doctor” and makes anything that person says about medicine seem more authoritative. Scarcity — In general, the fear of loss is more powerful than the hope of gain. By properly engaging the instinctive tendency to avoid losing something — or avoid losing the chance to possess something desirable — you can trigger a “yes” response with scarcity.

Communication is critical to success in business and life. Concerned about an upcoming interview? Anxious about being asked to give your thoughts during a meeting? Fearful about needing to provide critical feedback in the moment? You are not alone! Learn and practice techniques that will help you speak spontaneously with greater confidence and clarity, regardless of content and context.

Recorded on October 25, 2014, in collaboration with the Stanford Alumni Association as part of Stanford Reunion Homecoming and the Graduate School of Business Fall Reunion/Alumni Weekend.

Speaker: Matt Abrahams, ’91 Matt Abrahams is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, teaching strategic communication; he also teaches public speaking in Stanford’s Continuing Studies Program.

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